JOURNEY OF AGING MOVES FORWARD

Guests: Jennifer Baird, Dir. of Development, Coordinator, JOURNEY OF AGING;  Marianne Gariti, Owner, and Heidi Stanley, Moving Forward

JOURNEY OF AGING, a resource guide for caregivers and aging adults in south central Wisconsin, continues to expand in distribution, content and geographical reach.  The Fall 2017 issue will soon be available at all the distribution centers where free publications are offered.

On this program, Jennifer Baird, Coordinator of JOURNEY OF AGING for its publisher, Towns & Associates, describes the expansion of the publication and the range of engaging articles included in the magazine.  Joining Jennifer are Marianne Gariti, owner, and Heidi Stanley from Moving Forward, a Senior Move Management company that helps seniors move or downsize – coordinating every aspect of the move and transition.  Moving Forward’s story and services are featured in just one of the many informative articles included in the fall issue.

For more information go to journeyofaging.com and movingforwardmadison.com.

WISCONSIN ALZHEIMER’S INSTITUTE WRAPS ITS WORK AROUND ALZHEIMER’S

Guest:  Jane Mahoney, MD, Professor, UW Division of Geriatrics;  Director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute

The Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute was founded in 1998 and is within the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.  It is separate from the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center which was established in 2009 at UW with a grant from the National Institute on Aging.  Both programs are under UW’s School of Medicine and Public Health’s major Initiative to End Alzheimer’s and demonstrate UW’s recognition as a premier Alzheimer’s research center.

On this program, Jane Mahoney, MD, describes the breadth of the Institute’s outreach in Wisconsin and their primary research, the WRAP study, which is the world’s largest longitudinal research study on adults whose parents were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.  The goals are to identify Alzheimer’s early – before symptoms appear – and understand biological, health, and lifestyle factors that increase or decrease risk.

For an overview of where the vast research community is today on identifying the causes, effective treatments, and hopefully a cure for Alzheimer’s, tune in this program.  Learn, also, what you can do to decrease your risk of developing this devastating disease.

“TRIBES” ADD LIFE TO YOUR YEARS

Guests:  Carmela Mulroe, Director of Activities and Volunteers; Ashley Lund, Activity Coordinator/TRIBE Facilitator; Patricia Vallon, Bobbie Jackson, Shirley Lewis, Ann Moran, residents – SSM Health St. Mary’s Care Center

New research underscores the growing awareness that loneliness and social isolation influence the risk of early death.  In fact, according to researchers at Brigham Young University, loneliness and social isolation are bigger threats to public health than obesity which affects more than a third of adults in the United States.  No where can the threat be more present than when typically older people who require the care provided in skilled care facilities let go of the life they always knew and move into a facility providing the care they need.

Carmela Mulroe is well aware of the difficulty this transition can be and knows that beside food, shelter and clothing, a person’s total needs include feeling a sense of belonging, of engagement, of purpose, of self worth.  As a result, TRIBE, an acronym for True Relationships Build Engagement/Empowerment was introduced at St. Mary’s Care Center.  In TRIBES, small groups of residents gather together and take charge of their lives, their activities, their goals and future plans.  Is it working?  Are they engaged?  Do they feel at home?

On this program, you will hear from Patricia Vallon, Bobbie Jackson, Shirley Lewis and Ann Moran – all residents and active members of a TRIBE at St. Mary’s Care Center.  They make the lives they are living now come to life as they describe what their TRIBE has meant to them.  Joining them on the program are Carmela Mulroe and Ashley Lund.

NAMI WALKS TO SOLVE OUR MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS

Guest:  Lindsay Wallace, Executive Director, NAMI Dane County

One in 5 Americans live with a mental health condition.  Fifty percent begin by age 14 and 75 percent develop by age 24.  Yet fewer than one-third of adults and one-half of children with a mental health condition receive services and treatment in a given year.  The result of this failure is often tragic: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in ages 15-24.

Early engagement and support are crucial to turning around these devastating statistics.  That’s why NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Health) exists: to respond to those in need; to provide no-cost education programs; to build awareness and replace ignorance with understanding; to advocate at the national, state and local levels to improve the lives of persons affected by mental illness.

On this program, Lindsay Wallace shares her personal mental illness journey and describes the warning signs, the challenges, and what people can do to confront mental illness.  She also gives details on NAMIWalks 2017, scheduled for Sunday, October 1, at Olin-Turville Park. Registration is 10:30 am. Walk is at noon.

For more information and to sign up to WALK, go to namiwalks.org/danecounty.

HOW A BLIND LAMB CAN CHANGE LIVES

Guest:  Jim Thompson, author, Peanut of Blind Faith Farm

There are more sheep in the world than any other farm or ranch animal.  And then there is PEANUT, the star of the heartwarming true story, Peanut of Blind Faith Farm.  Described as a delightful book for adults and children alike, the bigger story of PEANUT, a tiny lamb born blind, helps all of us expand our concept of normal and gain empathy and acceptance of those who struggle through adversity.

On this program, meet Jim Thompson, the author of Peanut’s story.  An Air Force veteran, Jim returned to Wisconsin, graduated from UW-Milwaukee with a degree in zoology and spent 20 years as a Lake Michigan Fisheries Technician with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  It wasn’t until he semi-retired and took up hobby farming with his wife, Laura, that Peanut entered the scene and changed their lives and turned Jim into an author, presenting Peanut’s problem and solutions in a way that unfolds naturally. The underlying message of empowerment for the disabled – animal and human – comes to life on the pages of this delightful picture book illustrated by Rebecca Gavney Driscoll.

For more information or to order the book, go to blindfaithfarm.com.