MADISON COLLEGE EXPANDS TO THE SOUTH SIDE

Guests:  Jack E . Daniels, PhD, President, Madison College; Steve Goldberg, Gift Development Specialist, Madison College

After much research, data gathering, conversations and community will, the new Madison College South Madison Comprehensive Campus is well on its way to becoming a visible reality on the corner of Park Street and Badger Road.  Why the south side?  Because that is where the greatest need is according to a diverse group of community leaders.  Realizing that education is the great equalizer, Floyd Rose of 100 Black Men says, “Given that employment is the fundamental pathway from poverty, Madison College is, without equal, the most effective means of empowerment” in south and southwest Madison.  Renee Moe, President & CEO, United Way of Dane County agrees. “Education is one of the building blocks to a stable life. This new facility will help address the social, racial and economic disparities we see in Dane County.” Zach Brandon, President, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, is equally enthused. “The Madison College South Campus represents a critical investment and an important step toward driving equity, retaining talent in our region, and building an advanced economy that works for everyone.”

On this program, Dr. Jack E. Daniels walks us through the process that led to the building of the new south side campus and how it will address the educational, social, financial and support needs of the community it serves.  You will hear about the academic courses with a focus on STEM fields, business/marketing and entrepreneurship, plus a STEM Academy partnership with local high schools that will address the skilled worker void in Wisconsin and prepare students for the economic needs of tomorrow.

Joining Dr. Daniels on the program is Steve Goldberg who is consulting with Madison College to help raise the additional funds needed.  To learn more, go to supportmadisoncollege.org.

LUNG CANCER AND RADON

Guests:  Susan Smedley Gerber, Event Manager, Lung Cancer Research Foundation’s Free to Breathe Yoga Challenge;  Jessica Maloney, Indoor Air & Radon Program Manager, Wisconsin Dept. of Health Services

January is National Radon Action Month.  Why is this important?  Radon is a naturally occurring, odorless, colorless, radioactive gas that is found in Wisconsin homes.  Long-term exposure to radon is also the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.  Cigarette smoking remains the most common cause of lung cancer, but exposure to the combination of radon gas and cigarette smoke creates a greater risk of lung cancer than exposure to either factor alone.  It is estimated that more than 10 percent of radon-related cancer deaths occur among nonsmokers.  Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.

On this program, Susan Smedley Gerber and Jessica Maloney describe the higher risk of radon exposure in Wisconsin and the importance of having a simple home test to determine if high radon levels are present.  If high levels are confirmed, mitigation by a certified radon contractor is recommended.

For more information including testing and mitigation, go to www.lowradon.org.  To participate in the Free to Breathe Madison Yoga Challenge, go to www.freetobreathe.org/madison. The event is Saturday, June 16, at Lake farm Park.

TO FITBIT OR NOT: THRIVING INTO YOUR LATER YEARS

Guest:  Frank Byrne, MD, President Emeritus, SSM Health at St. Mary’s Hospital in Madison – retired President of St. Mary’s Hospital

Dr. Frank Byrne served as president of St. Mary’s from 2004-2015.  While he may have retired from his very visible and demanding leadership role at St. Mary’s, he has not retired from continuing to pursue an active and purposeful life.

On this program, Dr. Byrne shares his philosophy and medical expertise as he highlights what it takes to remain healthy and relevant throughout life.  A good way to kick off the New Year!

THE MADISON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION’S 75TH YEAR OF GIVING

Guests:  Bob Sorge, President, Madison Community Foundation;  Diane Ballweg, Chair, Madison Community Foundation Board

During this season of giving, we celebrate the years of giving – 75 to be exact – that the Madison Community Foundation has contributed to the past, present, and future of Greater Madison.  As the Madison Community Foundation has grown over the years, contributing to the fabric of our community, the MCF is marking its 75th anniversary year by looking to the future and awarding 12 major gifts totaling nearly $1 million through May 2018.

On this program, Bob Sorge and Diane Ballweg reflect on what the Madison Community Foundation has meant to Greater Madison and give us a glimpse into the vision the grants will fulfill.  Eight of the 12 grants have been announced from # 1 – the transformation of the Nolan Waterfront to # 8 – Mad About Bikes.

Included in the expansion of Madison’s vibrant biking culture is a 1,000 bicycle giveaway, supporting Free Bikes 4 Kidz Madison. The public collection day of gently-used bikes is 9am-1pm Saturday, January 13, at select SSM Health Dean Medical Group locations.

For more information on giving, including the new Greater Madison nonprofit directory and tax implications on charitable giving, go to madisongives.org.

THE STORY OF ONE CITY EARLY LEARNING CENTER STARTS AT THE BEGINNING

Guest:  Kaleem Caire, Founder, CEO/President, One City Early Learning Centers

“To prepare young children from birth to age 5 for success in school and life, and ensure they enter grade school reading-ready” is the mission of One City Early Learning Centers.  Thanks to the efforts and persistence of “One City” founder, Kaleem Caire, and the generosity of many community citizens, “One City” is now settled in their home on Madison’s south side preparing preschoolers for success in school and life.

On this program, Kaleem Caire describes how his personal life story inspired him to “create a village” that brings together parents, teachers, neighbors, community partners and policy makers – all focused on the same goal – to cultivate the love of education and all its benefits in the youngest among us.  Believing that education powers a community and is the great equalizer when disparities exist, hear how “One City” is working to build a community of healthy, happy, thoughtful and resourceful young children who will possess the capacity to make their families, community and the world a better place.

To support or volunteer at “One City,” go to onecityearlylearning.org.