IS THE PRESIDENCY IMPOSSIBLE FOR ONE PERSON TO MANAGE?

Guest:  Jeremi Suri, Professor of History and Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs, University of Texas at Austin

Studying the past to make his case, Jeremi Suri suggests it might be time to rethink the Presidency itself in his recently-released book, THE IMPOSSIBLE PRESIDENCY: THE RISE AND FALL OF AMERICA’S HIGHEST OFFICE.

On this program, Jeremi Suri takes us on an historical journey through the personalities, accomplishments and failures of ten former Presidents, beginning with George Washington through the present day.  He describes how each of them framed and expanded the role of the Presidency to the point where the massive responsibilities and challenges of conducting the office today may require an expansive model of leadership. “While Presidents were heroes in the past, they became targets of derision by the second half of the twentieth century,” states Suri.

Jeremi Suri, a former history professor at the University of Wisconsin/Madison, will be in Madison to discuss his book on Wednesday, November 1, at 7 pm at Mystery to Me Bookstore on Monroe Street and Thursday, November 2 at 5:30 pm at the Madison Central Library as part of the Wisconsin Book Festival.

THE HUMANITIES TRANSFORM LIVES IN THE UW ODYSSEY PROJECT

Guests:  Kevin Mullen, Associate Director; Char Braxton and Sahira Rocillo, UW Odyssey graduates…

Based on the belief that the gateway out of poverty and disenfranchisement can come through exposure to powerful works of philosophy, literature, art history, American history and writings, the UW Odyssey Project was born 15 years ago under the leadership of Emily Auerbach.  The two-semester UW Odyssey Project offers University of Wisconsin-Madison humanities classes for adult students facing economic barriers to college.  Students receive free tuition, textbooks, childcare, and a weekly dinner – barriers that are removed through support from the UW-Madison, grants, and private donations.

And transform lives it does. On this program listen to Kevin Mullen, Char Braxton and Sahira Rocillo as they describe their discovery of the Odyssey Project and the path the Project carved out for their lives. Words and writing are at the core of their journey, and Sahira and Char share excerpts from their original works.

The public is invited to experience the transformation at the Night of the Living Humanities, a benefit for the UW Odyssey Project, Thursday, October 26, 5-7 pm at the University Club, 803 State St.  You will meet Odyssey students dressed in costumes inspired by the Odyssey curriculum including Char Braxton as author Toni Morrison and Sahira Rocillo as artist Frida Kahlo.  For more information and ticket reservation, go to odyssey.wisc.edu/rsvp.

RESOLVING CONFLICT, THREATS AND VIOLENCE

Guest:  John Tyler, member, Christian Science Board of Lectureship

John Tyler has been an activist in his broad professional life – including working as a labor organizer to protect exploited sweatshop workers, counseling inmates in a state penitentiary, and teaching political science at Princeton and the University of Pittsburgh where he founded a residence for students in an effort to heal racial divisions in America.  For his involvement, he received the YWCA’s Racial Justice Award.

On this program, John Tyler, now a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship, discusses his approach to resolving conflict from family issues to how we confront some of the major acts of violence and disparities that are increasingly part of the fabric of America.  He will be in Madison on Sunday, October 29, speaking on Conflict Resolution: A Spiritual Approach, at First Church of Christ Scientist, 610 S. Segoe Road, at 2 pm.  The event is free and open to the public.

THE BEACON: A NEW PLACE OF HOPE AND HELP FOR THE HOMELESS

Guest:  Jackson Fonder, President/CEO of Catholic Charities of Madison
The Beacon – a comprehensive day resource center for people who are experiencing homelessness in Dane County opens its doors in the former Madison Chamber of Commerce building on East Washington Avenue on October 16.  An Open House for the public will be held Friday afternoon, October 13.
On this program, Jackson Fonder, President and CEO of Catholic Charities of Madison, the organization selected to provide the multi-level services housed within The Beacon, takes us on an audio walk through of the building and the experience their guests can expect.  The list is long – from covering the basic needs of showers, laundry services, food and clothing to empowerment resources of personal mailboxes, proper identification, computer training, resume writing, educational classes, mental health and substance abuse counseling and a private area for families.
 
The Beacon will continue to evolve to address the issues of homelessness under one roof and be a place of dignity and possibility.  Volunteers are needed to support the multitude of services that will be provided.  
Learn more at TheBeaconHelps.org.

HOW IS POOR SLEEP RELATED TO ALZHEIMER’S?

Guest:  Barbara Bendlin, PhD, principal investigator, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

One in three Americans doesn’t get enough sleep, and inadequate sleep has been linked to a number of health conditions. Now researchers are looking closely at the relationship between poor sleep and Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. One of these researchers is Barbara Bendlin, PhD, a principal investigator at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at UW-Madison, whose NIH-funded research on sleep and Alzheimer’s was presented at the recent Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in London and reported by CNN and the New York Times.

On this program, Dr. Bendlin describes her research, which included 101 cognitively-normal middle age participants, and her findings on how inadequate and poor quality sleep may put people at higher risk for Alzheimer’s/dementia.

You will also hear about the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s upcoming Public Health Education Event, “The Science Behind Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Brain Health,” Wednesday, October 4, 2017, from 5:00-8:00 p.m. at Gordon Commons on the University of Wisconsin campus.  The community lecture will feature guest keynote speaker, Dr. Martha Clare Morris, an authority on nutrition and aging and the creator of the MIND diet for healthy brain aging.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required, but it is appreciated.  For registration, event details, and parking, go to www.adrc.wisc.edu.